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Tips for Finding a Torque Gauge

Torque gauges are an important tool for measuring torque in many automotive environments, but some people are not aware of what to look for when they’re in the market for this instrument. Luckily, Cooper Instruments & Systems is here to help guide you through this process.

 

Torque essentially measures the turning force on an object, e.g. how much turning power a car has. For instance, with a foot long wrench applying 500 pounds of pressure in a perpendicular fashion, this would be 500 pounds of torque. In a car, this is what causes acceleration. The higher the torque, the better the car can accelerate. (Torque is different from horsepower, which calculates the power needed to move a certain amount of weight during a certain period of time.)

 

Torque is far easier to measure than horsepower. Horsepower is measured using dynamometers, but dynamometers get the horsepower calculation from measuring torque. Both torque and horsepower combine to give an idea of the overall power of the car. More torque and horsepower generally mean a better performing engine.

 

To measure torque appropriately, it’s vital to have the right tools. Advice on finding a torque gauge depends largely on a person’s level of experience in the automotive industry. An old hand could easily go it alone and get a decent torque gauge on the internet, where torque gauges can be found for a good price. Someone new to the process will definitely want the help of professionals.

 

At Cooper Instruments & Systems, we provide the assistance necessary to get a torque gauge that fits your needs and budget. There are different kinds of gauges, some of which may work better with different makes of cars and different vehicles, and we can help in selecting the right one. Click to view our selection of torque load cells or torque gauges. In addition to torque gauges, we also can assist with pressure gauges, calibration of systems, and more.

 

 

For more information about Cooper Instruments & Systems, please contact Rex Cooper at (800) 344-3921 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

As always, if you have any questions related to this material, our support staff at Cooper Instruments is available to help. Contact them by calling (800) 344-3921 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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Picking up the thread of reducing waste and wasteful practice in industry, the Bureau in the 1920s tackled issues of efficiency in a range of products and industries, particularly the growing auto industry, with studies on auto engines, tires and oils, and public utilities with studies on improving gas appliances and minimizing dielectric loss. Testing on construction materials, crucial to Hoover’s home building initiative, concluded that often more of a building material was used than was structurally necessary, when less material would produce a structurally sound building. Other projects of the time included everything from sound-proofing techniques to fire-proofing to recovery of waste sugar.

 

Bureau investigations during the 1920’s on gas and gas appliances proved to have a significant impact on public health and safety. On its own initiative and using funds granted by Congress in 1915 for investigation of public utility standards, the Bureau began a new investigation of the gas industry prompted by rising gas prices and a belief that that the natural gas feeding half of the cities and towns in the country was in short supply. The Bureau’s aim at the outset of the investigation was to promote conservation of this supposedly dwindling resource.

 

Testing concluded that the greatest source of natural gas waste was domestic appliances, prompting the Bureau’s publication "How to get better service with less natural gas in domestic gas appliances." In the course of the overall gas project, the Bureau also tested a number of “gas-saving” devices that promised to lower consumers’ gas bills when used in conjunction with their gas appliances. These products actually did no such thing and in many cases their use created additional safety dangers. The true culprits were the poor design and faulty installation of appliances, though Bureau recommendations for design changes to stoves, water heaters and room heaters were met with backlash from the industry or were simply rejected.

 

The winter of 1922-1923 saw an increase across the country in deaths from gas poisoning. The Bureau worked together with municipal health departments to compile data on fatalities attributed to carbon monoxide, which, in turn, shed light on the gas industry’s dubious practice of attributing all gas-related fatalities to suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning (even in cities supplied by natural gas which did not contain carbon monoxide). A subsequent investigation by the Bureau in conjunction with Baltimore’s Consolidated Gas & Electric Co. and public health officials reaffirmed gas appliances to be the primary source. Upon publication of the findings, the president of the American Gas Association, enraged, “demanded that further publication be withheld.” The data, however, was undeniable and the Association ended up installing a research associate group at the Bureau. They later hired a Bureau gas engineer and set up their own laboratories and quickly revamped the industry. Within a couple of years, gas poisoning deaths in Baltimore had all but been eliminated. So this shows but one example of how the Bureau’s work could literally be a matter of life or death for the public.

 

By the mid-1920s the Bureau was reporting that domestic production of scientific and industrial instrumentation had increased to 80% as opposed to 15% before the war. They also reported much greater cooperation from industry, especially large corporations, than they had received at the Bureau’s inception. A widespread concern of the time affecting many different industries and interests was the standardization of color.

 

The colorimetry section was formally established within the optics division of the Bureau in 1915, but Bureau interest in the topic went back to 1912 when they were called on to aid oil, butter and margarine makers with color grading their products. When the section was established, they had requests regarding color issues as they related to glass, headlights, paper, sugar and many others. At the time, two color scales were in use, but both had limited application. The unique problem with measuring color is that it is, to a degree, subjective. That is, color is in the eye of the beholder. Recognizing this psychological element to the way humans perceive color, the Bureau studied 150 subjects to establish a data curve. This curve was accepted as the standard by the International Commission for Illumination in 1924. Further years of work eventually resulted in the Bureau’s dictionary of colors and color names.

 

**The information presented here is drawn from “Measures For Progress: A History of The National Bureau of Standards” (Rexmond C. Cochrane)

 

As always, if you have any questions related to this material, our support staff at Cooper Instruments is available to help. Contact them by calling (800) 344-3921 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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The Technology Behind Truck Weigh Stations

 

Truck weigh stations are obviously used to weigh trucks – hence the name – but most people don’t know why trucks need to be weighed. And even fewer know how weigh stations operate. Here is a brief look at three different truck weigh station systems and why they are necessary.

 

What are Weigh Stations For?

Weigh stations are primarily used by the United States to collect taxes on transported goods. The amount of taxes owed is determined by the weight. The stations are also used to determine whether trucks are within a particular road system’s safety guidelines. Most private vehicles are exempt from weigh stations, while commercial vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, or having three or more axles, are required to pay fuel taxes.

 

Load Cell Systems

The most popular weigh station system is the load cell system. It is comprised of steel or concrete, and has multiple strain gauges embedded within. These gauges transmit electric currents to a junction box, which measures the variance in the current and calculates the weight on the scale.

 

Bending Plate Systems

The bending plate system uses metal plates with attached strain gauges. When weight is applied to the scale, the strain gauges measure the amount of stress on the plates and calculate the amount of weight the scale is supporting.

 

Piezoelectric Systems

These systems use a number of piezoelectric sensors embedded in conducting material. Weight is applied to the scale and the pressure changes the amount of electrical charge in the conductors. Sensors then measure the change in voltage and calculate the weight of the load.

 

As always, if you have any questions related to this material, our support staff at Cooper Instruments is available to help. Contact them by calling (800) 344-3921 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

COOPER INSTRUMENTS & SYSTEMS ANNOUNCES ONLINE ORDERING

 

August 5, 2014

Warrenton, VA

 

Cooper Instruments & Systems proudly announces the launch of their new eCommerce online ordering system. Recognizing the needs and wishes of both their domestic and international clientele, Cooper Instruments has implemented 24/7 online ordering of their wide selection of load cells, pressure transducers, digital instrumentation and related force measurement equipment.

 

“We are excited to be offering online ordering to our customers,” said Rex Cooper, President and CEO of Cooper Instruments. He continued, “We understand that eCommerce has become the preferred method of purchasing for many organizations. We hope that our customers find this service to be a valuable addition to the many other services Cooper Instruments can offer.”

 

Cooper went on to say that the company encourages its customers to share feedback regarding their experience the new online ordering system and added that, as always, the company’s sales team continues to be available by phone to help with orders at 800-344-3921.

 

Cooper Instruments & Systems is a worldwide leading supplier of force and pressure measurement instrumentation, sensor systems and custom calibration services. Since opening for business in 1988, their products and systems have been used extensively around the globe.

 

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For more information about Cooper Instruments & Systems, please contact Rex Cooper at (800) 344-3921 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

As always, if you have any questions related to this material, our support staff at Cooper Instruments is available to help. Contact them by calling (800) 344-3921 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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Our last installment mentioned that Secretary Hoover wanted to reduce industrial waste and use resources more efficiently. A report by the Federated American Engineering Societies in the 1920s had concluded that between 25-50% of production costs could be eliminated by eliminating waste (including, in some cases, wasteful labor practices). Hoover’s aims at achieving waste reduction affected the Bureau directly on two fronts: 1) that material waste reduction would be achieved by setting standards of quality, simplifying grades and reducing unnecessary variety; and 2) that labor waste reduction would be achieved by scientific development of better processes and methods and invention of labor-saving devices.

 

“The crusade for standardization” became a phrase used to express the objectives of standardizing materials and business practices, reducing extraneous variety, and producing quality specifications. Independent of, but in close connection with the Bureau, the actual authority regarding industry standards was the American Engineering Standards Committee or AESC (later renamed the American Standards Association). The year 1927 saw the first publication of the Bureau’s “Standards Yearbook” which provided fundamental information on standardization which by then, it claimed, affected “every phase of design, production, and utilization." Industrialized countries around the world underwent their own “crusades for standardization” during the same period, as the phenomenon was not contained to the US, though with the distinction that in the US it was driven largely by industry as a matter of increasing profit, whereas abroad it was more likely to be a government initiative.

 

As we have seen earlier, establishing quality standards for government purchasing was one of the Bureau’s former tasks, though for a long time, each department or agency had its own purchasing department and its own quality standards. With the establishment in 1921 of the Bureau of the Budget came the creation of the Federal Specifications Board which bound all Federal purchasing to Bureau quality standards.

 

The general procedure, then, was for the Bureau to conduct research and recommend a standard, which was then conveyed to the AESC. From there, the draft of the Federal specification was disseminated to industry representatives who, in turn, provided feedback until a standard was approved. In this way, the Bureau prepared 72 specifications between 1921 and 1924 and 150 new specifications between 1925 and 1928.

 

Together with other concerned parties, the Bureau published the “National directory of commodity specifications” in 1925, including 27,000 specifications for 6,650 commodities, which Secretary Hoover envisioned as a “Buyers’ Bible” to support industrial and Federal purchasing.

 

Of the various branches of the standardization initiative, the general public seemed most interested in the topic of simplification because it was easy to understand and often came with staggering statistics. For example, a Bureau report in 1921 showed excessive variety in style and material when there was no real demand for such variety and consumers would have been content with a more standardized selection. The same report found that this issue alone represented an annual 30% loss of American energy.

 

As its first two recommendations, the Bureau’s division of simplified practice reduced the available sizes of paving bricks from 66 to 7 and beds from 20+ varieties to 4 widths and one arbitrary length (we see the vestiges of this in our current twin/full/queen/king sizes). In cooperation with the Bureau, savings over $293 million were estimated in nine key industries within 5 years. A study in 1926 found compliance rates to the new standards to be at 79.5%, exceeding expectations, which had assumed that manufacturers and consumers would try to hold on to eliminated sizes/styles of product. The program continued to enjoy much success with manufacturers reporting savings and benefits seen in numerous facets of their operations. As such, Hoover created within the Bureau the division of trade standards to consolidate activities related to standards and publish specifications with industry-wide application.

 

While manufacturers accepted the reduction in variety and standardization of their products relatively readily, as they saw the results on their balance sheets, consumers continued to want that additional variety in some products. In an ironic example, the heads of the simplified practice division at Commerce requested typewriters for their division that were not of the manufacturer and type style used throughout the rest of the organization. Their request was denied on those grounds but they insisted until their purchase was approved, illustrating that limited variety does not always suit all needs or wants of the end user. As the country rebounded from the post-war depression, both industry and consumer became less compliant with Government simplification recommendations until the program was drastically cut, though not abandoned, when the Great Depression hit.

 

**The information presented here is drawn from “Measures For Progress: A History of The National Bureau of Standards” (Rexmond C. Cochrane)

 

As always, if you have any questions related to this material, our support staff at Cooper Instruments is available to help. Contact them by calling (800) 344-3921 or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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Cooper Instruments & Systems is pleased to serve clients around the globe, from the United States to Europe and Asia. Growth projections in Asia mean that they will be able to offer high-standard products more easily in the future.

 

Warrenton, VA (SBWire) July 8, 2014 – The IMF’s growth projections of 5.4% for 2014 and 5.5% for 2015 for Asia are beneficial for Cooper Instruments & Systems, as they will bolster the company’s finances and allow them to provide superior service for their clients around the globe.

 

“We couldn’t be happier with the projections in Asia,” a representative from Cooper Instruments & Systems reported. “It seems like 2015 will be a very positive year for us as a company, and this means that we’ll be able to expand and enhance our operations for all of our clients, no matter where they are located.”

 

It’s not just the growth projections that are giving Cooper Instruments & Systems something to celebrate. It’s also that vehicle sales in vital markets like China are booming. As Cooper Instruments & Systems works extensively with auto manufacturers and the auto industry, this means business will be better than ever.

 

“It’s good to know that more people around the world are owning cars,” the Cooper Instruments & Systems representative went on to say. “It’s not just that it’s good for our business, though; it’s a sure sign that the economy as a whole is improving, since more and more people can afford to buy vehicles. It’s a win-win situation for everybody, as far as we’re concerned.”

 

China’s automotive market growth is particularly impressive, as in 2013 it was the first nation to report over 20 million automotive units sold.

 

“Even more impressive is that, even with these remarkable numbers coming out of China, it still remains a nation with low car ownership over all,” the Cooper Instruments & Systems representative said. “There is lots of room for growth.”

 

It is estimated that there are only 120 million vehicles in China, which is extremely low for a country that has nearly a billion and a half people. Only time will tell where the Asian market will go, but Cooper Instruments & Systems is looking forward to the future, and will continue to serve its clients, both new and old, with diligence and care.

 

About Cooper Instruments & Systems

Since 1988, Cooper Instruments & Systems has been a worldwide leading supplier of force and pressure instrumentation, sensor systems and custom calibration services. Cooper Instruments & Systems offers equipment such as load cells, torque cells, force and pressure sensors, torque gages, pressure transducers, pressure gages, digital instrumentation, hand-helds, test stands, custom test stands, and more. For more information, please visit CooperInstruments.com.

 

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